1. stillastar:

(via The best book covers, movie posters, and magazine covers of 2013)
Because, obviously.

    stillastar:

    (via The best book covers, movie posters, and magazine covers of 2013)

    Because, obviously.

  2. Anne Lamott advocates “shitty first drafts,” Nike tells us to “Just Do It,” and I recommend McDonald’s just to get people so grossed out they come up with a better idea. It’s all the same thing. Lamott, Nike, and McDonald’s Theory are all saying that the first step isn’t as hard as we make it out to be. Once I got an email from Steve Jobs, and it was just one word: “Go!” Exactly. Dive in. Do. Stop over-thinking it.

    —  — This. (via a very brilliant-sounding McDonald’s Theory)

  3. "Thanks to everyone at Businessweek, but especially Richard Turley, Businessweek’s creative director, and David Parkins, who created the illustration. This cover is why we’ll never quit magazines." (via Businessweek Does it Again)
Can’t say it better if we try…

    "Thanks to everyone at Businessweek, but especially Richard Turley, Businessweek’s creative director, and David Parkins, who created the illustration. This cover is why we’ll never quit magazines." (via Businessweek Does it Again)

    Can’t say it better if we try…

  4. newmanology:

As you may have noticed, Newmanology hasn’t been tumbling much of late. Robert Newman, our friend and colleague, and this blog’s creator, has been hospitalized since March 19th. After several days in critical condition and two weeks in a coma, he is now recovering…You can find out more—and help him out!—at www.DonationTo.com/FriendsofBobNewman. You can also keep up at the “Friends of Bob Newman” page on Facebook. (www.facebook.com/FriendsOfRobertNewman) Thanks!

Good people, there’s power in numbers: WE CAN DO THIS!

    newmanology:

    As you may have noticed, Newmanology hasn’t been tumbling much of late. Robert Newman, our friend and colleague, and this blog’s creator, has been hospitalized since March 19th. After several days in critical condition and two weeks in a coma, he is now recovering…You can find out more—and help him out!—at www.DonationTo.com/FriendsofBobNewman. You can also keep up at the “Friends of Bob Newman” page on Facebook. (www.facebook.com/FriendsOfRobertNewman) Thanks!

    Good people, there’s power in numbers: WE CAN DO THIS!

  5. "But we have chosen to recognise an in-house design team which has had an enormous impact on its industry. Under creative director Richard Turley, (not forgetting editor Josh Tyrangiel) Bloomberg Businessweek has trounced its rivals with a verve and energy that recalls the heyday of the printed magazine."
Creative Review chooses their “Design Studio of the Year”

    "But we have chosen to recognise an in-house design team which has had an enormous impact on its industry. Under creative director Richard Turley, (not forgetting editor Josh Tyrangiel) Bloomberg Businessweek has trounced its rivals with a verve and energy that recalls the heyday of the printed magazine."

    Creative Review chooses their “Design Studio of the Year”

  6. Friends of Bob Newman: some @Newmanology news about our friend and mentor →

    Our goal is to raise at least $50,000

    This number may seem huge, but the costs already incurred are staggering, and there is much more to come. It also may seem unattainable, but here’s one way to think about this: 

    If 500 of Bob’s friends and colleagues (every member of the FoBN group plus about 100 more) contributed an average of $100—what some might spend on an evening out—we would immediately reach that goal.

    Immediately.

    Bob has been so generous, given us all so much over the years, whether it’s been jobs, introductions, advice, laughs, musical tips, links, or just his ready smile and his quiet, steady friendship. This is a moment for us all to give back to him.

    _________

    For the past few weeks, our friend and colleague Bob Newman has been hospitalized. He spent several days in critical condition and two weeks in a coma, but is now recovering and working hard to get back to health. We’ve started this page to do all we can to support his recovery. Here’s Christine Curry’s account of what has happened so far: “On Tuesday, March 19th, Bob was in Ft. Myers, Florida visiting his mother with our 9 year old daughter, Ivy. He was at the pool with her, and went to retrieve her goggles. He had a seizure, collapsed by the pool, and suffered severe head trauma. An ambulance was called immediately. He managed to call me from the ambulance to say he was going with Ivy to the hospital because he bumped his head, and that he would call when he got home to let us know he was okay. He was admitted to Lee Memorial hospital’s ICU unit. A bit later, I received a call from his mother from the hospital for insurance information and she told me the situation was worse—his brain was hemorrhaging, and he fell into a coma. Bob was in critical condition for several days, and had to be put on a respirator. His condition finally stabilized, and there started to be small signs of movement and response. In the meantime, much time and energy was spent trying to seek out potential facilities in or near New York City that would take a coma victim who was relying on a respirator. With the guidance and support of many parents at the Nightingale Bamford School, where Lillian and Ivy are students, and after major wrangling with insurance companies, we were able to secure a bed at Weill Cornell Presbytarian Hospital in their Neuro ICU. Bob was transported from Ft. Myers Hospital the morning of April 12th and flown to NYC in an air ambulance. He arrived around 4pm, a bit worse for the wear (the weather was awful, and the flight rough) but lucid and able to respond with his eyes and move his arms slightly. He was finally taken off the respirator, which enabled us to move him to an acute neuro-rehab facility at NYU. Bob is working hard to bring himself back to his strong self and will have to work on this for several months. His speech is improving and he is receiving a lot of physical therapy. In the meantime, in the course of our everyday lives, he is very missed by all of us. Our family appreciates the outpouring of your sentiments and encouraging words. It has been a great comfort to know that so many people love him.”

  7. I wish I hadn’t bought Newsweek. It was a mistake

    — 

    Barry Diller, April 29, 2013

    Meanwhile, The Archivist surges on.  Thanks Tumblr peep.

    (via nwkarchivist)

  8. stillastar:

YES.

    stillastar:

    YES.

    (Source: clarajudgypants)

  9. therumpus:

grantcuster:

A day late for his would-be 51st birthday it’s probably time I finally blog about my treatment of David Foster Wallace’s Host. The detailed explanation is available on site but wrapped up in the project is a long-held affection for Wallace, a curiosity about the still underexplored possibilities for long-form text on the internet and a desire to just try some stuff.
There are four different footnote options to explore and I’d love to hear peoples’ thoughts on their favorites, their most hated, or an option they would have liked to see instead.
Someday there’ll be a longer post on skeumorphism, footnotes vs. hyperlinks, physical vs. digital possibilities, and maybe content geography, but, for now, this.

If you are interested in web design or DFW or (especially) web design AND DFW, Grant Custer’s experiments in annotating the essay “Host” is ripe for your eyes. What better way to spend your lunch hour?

For all our people who are into skeumorphism, footnotes vs. hyperlinks, physical vs. digital possibilities, and maybe content geography… with love on a Friday at lunch!

    therumpus:

    grantcuster:

    A day late for his would-be 51st birthday it’s probably time I finally blog about my treatment of David Foster Wallace’s Host. The detailed explanation is available on site but wrapped up in the project is a long-held affection for Wallace, a curiosity about the still underexplored possibilities for long-form text on the internet and a desire to just try some stuff.

    There are four different footnote options to explore and I’d love to hear peoples’ thoughts on their favorites, their most hated, or an option they would have liked to see instead.

    Someday there’ll be a longer post on skeumorphism, footnotes vs. hyperlinks, physical vs. digital possibilities, and maybe content geography, but, for now, this.

    If you are interested in web design or DFW or (especially) web design AND DFW, Grant Custer’s experiments in annotating the essay “Host” is ripe for your eyes. What better way to spend your lunch hour?

    For all our people who are into skeumorphism, footnotes vs. hyperlinks, physical vs. digital possibilities, and maybe content geography… with love on a Friday at lunch!

  10. explore-blog:

Beloved cartoonist Hugh MacLeod follows up on Ignore Everybody with The Art Of Not Sucking, a compendium of advice on the creative life.
Complement with Neil Gaiman’s commencement address on the same subject.

Posting because, who DOESN’T need advice on the creative life?!

    explore-blog:

    Beloved cartoonist Hugh MacLeod follows up on Ignore Everybody with The Art Of Not Sucking, a compendium of advice on the creative life.

    Complement with Neil Gaiman’s commencement address on the same subject.

    Posting because, who DOESN’T need advice on the creative life?!

    (Source: )

  11. 'The magazine's March issue will mark the debut of a redesign overseen by creative director Darhil Crooks, who previously lent his design talents to Ebony and Esquire before joining The Atlantic in August. (According to editor in chief James Bennet, he’s also “kind of a genius.”)’ (via The Atlantic Gets a New Look)
For once, a redesign story crediting the actual designer. Huge kudos to Mr. Crooks!

    'The magazine's March issue will mark the debut of a redesign overseen by creative director Darhil Crooks, who previously lent his design talents to Ebony and Esquire before joining The Atlantic in August. (According to editor in chief James Bennet, he’s also “kind of a genius.”)’ (via The Atlantic Gets a New Look)

    For once, a redesign story crediting the actual designer. Huge kudos to Mr. Crooks!

  12. explore-blog:

In 1961, Playboy assembled some of the greatest designers in America for this spread. From left to right: George Nelson, Edward Wormley, Eero Saarinen, Harry Bertoia, Charles Eames, and Jens Risom.

#magazines for the win

    explore-blog:

    In 1961, Playboy assembled some of the greatest designers in America for this spread. From left to right: George Nelson, Edward Wormley, Eero Saarinen, Harry Bertoia, Charles Eames, and Jens Risom.

    #magazines for the win

  13. Goin’ type-nerd crazy in the best way, thanks to this post on Texas Monthly: TJ Tucker’s tour of the redesign. Part 1)

    Goin’ type-nerd crazy in the best way, thanks to this post on Texas Monthly: TJ Tucker’s tour of the redesign. Part 1)

  14. via P!: Karel Martens: Selected Letterpress Works →

    p-exclamation:

    When Karel Martens began studying art in Holland in the late 1950s, “graphic design” did not even exist as its own course of study. Today he is widely recognized as one of the most important practitioners of that very discipline, with an esteemed client list that includes major publishers,…

    Click-thru for some beautiful lunch-break inspiration…

  15. You have to make stuff. The tools of journalism are in your hands and no one is going to give a damn about what is on your resume, they want to see what you have made with your own little fingies. Can you use Final Cut Pro? Have you created an Instagram that is about something besides a picture of your cat every time she rolls over? Is HTML 5 a foreign language to you? Is your social media presence dominated by a picture of your beer bong, or is it an RSS of interesting stuff that you add insight to? People who are doing hires will have great visibility into what you can actually do, what you care about and how you can express on any number of platforms.

    — 

    David Carr, media columnist for the New York Times, via yesterday’s Reddit IAmA. (via futurejournalismproject)

    The best advice is the advice that everyone can use. Here’s to us makers!